2009 GMC Canyon Owners Manual PDF | Page 72

Your vehicle may or may not have roof-rail airbags.
See Airbag System on page 1-62. Roof-rail airbags are
intended to in?ate in moderate to severe side crashes.
Roof-rail airbags will in?ate if the crash severity is above
the system?s designed threshold level. The threshold
level can vary with speci?c vehicle design.
Roof-rail airbags are not intended to in?ate in frontal
impacts, near-frontal impacts, rollovers, or rear impacts.
Both roof-rail airbags will deploy when either side of
the vehicle is struck.
In any particular crash, no one can say whether an
airbag should have in?ated simply because of the
damage to a vehicle or because of what the repair costs
were. For frontal airbags, in?ation is determined by what
the vehicle hits, the angle of the impact, and how quickly
the vehicle slows down. For roof-rail airbags, deployment
is determined by the location and severity of the side
impact.
What Makes an Airbag In?ate?
In a deployment event, the sensing system sends an
electrical signal triggering a release of gas from the
in?ator. Gas from the in?ator ?lls the airbag causing the
bag to break out of the cover and deploy. The in?ator, the
airbag, and related hardware are all part of the airbag
module.
Frontal airbag modules are located inside the steering
wheel and instrument panel. For vehicles with roof-rail
airbags, there are airbag modules in the ceiling of the
vehicle, near the side windows that have occupant
seating positions.
How Does an Airbag Restrain?
In moderate to severe frontal or near frontal collisions,
even belted occupants can contact the steering wheel
or the instrument panel. In moderate to severe side
collisions, even belted occupants can contact the inside
of the vehicle.
Airbags supplement the protection provided by safety
belts. Frontal airbags distribute the force of the
impact more evenly over the occupant?s upper body,
stopping the occupant more gradually. Roof-rail airbags
distribute the force of the impact more evenly over
the occupant?s upper body.
But airbags would not help in many types of collisions,
primarily because the occupant?s motion is not
toward those airbags. See When Should an Airbag
In?ate? on page 1-67 for more information.
Airbags should never be regarded as anything more
than a supplement to safety belts.
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2009 GMC Canyon Owners Manual Summary of Content

Your vehicle may or may not have roof-rail airbags.See Airbag System on page 1-62. Roof-rail airbags areintended to inate in moderate to severe side crashes.Roof-rail airbags will inate if the crash severity is abovethe systems designed threshold level. The thresholdlevel can vary with specic vehicle design.Roof-rail airbags are not intended to inate in frontalimpacts, near-frontal impacts, rollovers, or rear impacts.Both roof-rail airbags will deploy when either side ofthe vehicle is struck.In any particular crash, no one can say whether anairbag should have inated simply because of thedamage to a vehicle or because of what the repair costswere. For frontal airbags, ination is determined by whatthe vehicle hits, the angle of the impact, and how quicklythe vehicle slows down. For roof-rail airbags, deploymentis determined by the location and severity of the sideimpact.What Makes an Airbag Inate?In a deployment event, the sensing system sends anelectrical signal triggering a release of gas from theinator. Gas from the inator lls the airbag causing thebag to break out of the cover and deploy. The inator, theairbag, and related hardware are all part of the airbagmodule.Frontal airbag modules are located inside the steeringwheel and instrument panel. For vehicles with roof-railairbags, there are airbag modules in the ceiling of thevehicle, near the side windows that have occupantseating positions.How Does an Airbag Restrain?In moderate to severe frontal or near frontal collisions,even belted occupants can contact the steering wheelor the instrument panel. In moderate to severe sidecollisions, even belted occupants can contact the insideof the vehicle.Airbags supplement the protection provided by safetybelts. Frontal airbags distribute the force of theimpact more evenly over the occupants upper body,stopping the occupant more gradually. Roof-rail airbagsdistribute the force of the impact more evenly overthe occupants upper body.But airbags would not help in many types of collisions,primarily because the occupants motion is nottoward those airbags. See When Should an AirbagInate? on page 1-67 for more information.Airbags should never be regarded as anything morethan a supplement to safety belts.1-68