Mitsubishi Mirage 1990 2000 Workshop Manual Chilton PDF | Page 2

.
1-2 GENERALINFORMATIONAND MAINTENANCE
Chitton’s Total Car Care manual for the 199M10
Mitsubishi Mirage, Galant and Diamante is intended
to help you learn more about the inner workings of
your vehicle while saving you money on its upkeep
and operation.
The beginning of the book will likely be referred to
the most, since that is where you will find information
for maintenance and tune-up. The other sections deal
with the more complex systems of your vehicle. Oper-
ating systems from engine through brakes are cov-
ered to the extent that the average do-it-yourselfer be-
comes mechanically involved. This book will not
explain such things as rebuilding a differential for the
simple reason that the expertise required and the in-
vestment in special tools make this task uneconomi-
cal. It will, however, give you detailed instructions to
help you change your own brake pads and shoes, re-
place spark plugs, and perform many more jobs that
can save you money, give you personal satisfaction
and help you avoid expensive problems.
A secondary purpose of this book is a reference for
owners who want to understand their vehicle and/or
their mechanics better. In this case, no tools at all are
required.
Before removing any bolts, read through the entire
procedure. This will give you the overall view of what
tools and supplies will be required. There is nothing
more frustrating than having to walk to the bus stop
on Monday morning because you were short one bolt
on Sunday afternoon. So read ahead and plan ahead.
Each operation should be approached logically and
all procedures thoroughly understood before attempt-
ing any work.
All sections contain adjustments, maintenance, re-
moval and installation procedures, and in some cases,
repair or overhaul procedures. When repair is not con-
sidered practical, we tell you how to remove the part
and then how to install the new or rebuilt replacement.
In this way, you at least save labor costs. “Backyard”
repair of some components is just not practical.
Many procedures in this book require you to “label
and disconnect. . a group of lines, hoses or wires.
Don’t be lulled into thinking you can remember where
everything goes-you won’t. If you hook up vacuum
or fuel lines incorrectly, the vehicle may run poorly, if
at all. If you hook up electrical wiring incorrectly, you
may instantly learn a very expensive lesson.
You don’t need to know the official or engineering
name for each hose or line. A piece of masking tape
on the hose and a piece on its fitting will allow you to
assign your own label such as the letter A or a short
name. As long as you remember your own code, the
lines can be reconnected by matching similar letters
or names. Do remember that tape will dissolve in
gasolrne or other fluids; if a component is to be
washed or cleaned, use another method of identifica-
tion. A permanent felt-tipped marker or a metal scribe
can be very handy for marking metal parts. Remove
any tape or paper labels after assembly.
It’s necessary to mention the difference between
maintenance and repair Maintenance includes rou-
tine inspections, adjustments, and replacement of
parts which show signs of normal wear Maintenance
compensates for wear or deterioration. Repair implies
that something has broken or is not working. A need
for repair is often caused by lack of maintenance. Ex-
ample, draining and refilling the automatic transaxle
fluid is maintenance recommended by the manufac-
turer at specific mileage intervals. Failure to do this
can shorten the life of the transmission/transaxle, re-
quiring very expensive repairs. While no maintenance
program can prevent items from breaking or wearing
out, a general rule can be stated: MAINTENANCE IS
CHEAPER THAN REPAIR.
Two basic mechanrc’s rules should be mentioned
here. First, whenever the left side of the vehicle or en-
gine is referred to, it is meant to specify the drivers
side. Conversely, the right side of the vehicle means
the passengers side. Second, screws and bolts are
removed by turning counterclockwise, and tightened
by turning clockwrse unless specifically noted.
Safety is always the most important rule. Con-
stantly be aware of the dangers involved in working
on an automobile and take the proper precautions.
See the informatron in this section regarding SER-
VICING YOUR VEHICLE SAFELY and the SAFETY
NOTICE on the acknowledgment page.
Pay attention to the instructions provided. There
are 3 common mistakes in mechanical work:
1. Incorrect order of assembly, disassembly or
adjustment. When taking something apart or putting
it together, performing steps in the wrong order usu-
ally just costs you extra time; however, it CAN break
something. Read the entire procedure before begin-
ning disassembly. Perform everything in the order in
which the instructions say you should, even if you
can’t immedrately see a reason for it. When you’re
taking apart something that is very intricate, you
might want to draw a picture of how it looks when as-
sembled at one point in order to make sure you get
everything back in its proper position. We will supply
exploded views whenever possible. When making
adjustments, perform them in the proper order. One
adjustment possibly will affect another.
2. Overtorquing (or undertorquing). While it is
more common for overtorquing to cause damage,
undertorquing may allow a fastener to vibrate loose
causing serious damage. Especially when dealing
with aluminum parts, pay attention to torque specifi-
cations and utilize a torque wrench in assembly. If a
torque figure is not available, remember that if you
are using the right tool to perform the job, you will
probably not have to strain yourself to get a fastener
tight enough. The pitch of most threads is so slight
that the tension you put on the wrench will be multi-
plied many times in actual force on what you are
tightening. A good example of how critical torque is
can be seen in the case of spark plug installation, es-
pecially where you are putting the plug into an alu-
minum cylinder head. Too little torque can fail to
crush the gasket, causing leakage of combustion
gases and consequent overheating of the plug and
engine parts. Too much torque can damage the
threads or distort the plug, changing the spark gap.
There are many commercial products available for
ensuring that fasteners won’t come loose, even if they
are not torqued just right (a very common brand is
Loctite? If you’re worried
about
getting something
together tight enough to hold, but loose enough to
avoid mechanical damage during assembly, one of
these products might offer substantial insurance. Be-
fore choosing a threadlocking compound, read the
label on the package and make sure the product is
compatible with the materials, fluids, etc. involved.
3. Crossthreading. This occurs when a part such
as a bolt is screwed into a nut or casting at the wrong
angle and forced. Crossthreading is more likely to
occur if access is difficult. It helps to clean and lubri-
cate fasteners, then to start threading the bolt, spark
plug, etc. with your fingers If you encounter resis-
tance, unscrew the part and start over again at a dif-
ferent angle until it can be inserted and turned several
times without much effort. Keep in mind that many
parts, especially spark plugs, have tapered threads,
so that gentle turning will automatically bring the part
you’re threading to the proper angle. Don’t put a
wrench on the part until its been tightened a couple
of turns by hand. If you suddenly encounter resis-
tance, and the part has not seated fully, don’t force it.
Pull it back out to make sure it’s clean and threading
properly.
Be sure to take your time and be patient, and al-
ways plan ahead. Allow yourself ample time to per-
form repairs and maintenance You may find main-
taining your car a satisfying and enjoyable
experience.
b See Figures 1 thru 15
Naturally, without the proper tools and equipment
it is impossible to properly service your vehicle. It
would also be virtually impossible
to
catalog every
tool that you would need to perform all of the opera-
tions in this book. Of course, It would be unwise for
the amateur to rush out and buy an expensive set of
tools on the theory that he/she may need one or more
of them at some time,
The best approach is to proceed slowly, gathering savings will
be
far outweighed by frustration and
a good quality set of those tools that are used most mangled knuckles.
frequently Don’t be misled by the low cost of bargain Begin accumulating those tools that are used most
tools. It is far better to spend a little more for better frequently: those associated with routine maintenance
quality. Forged wrenches, 6 or 12-point sockets and and tune-up. In addition to the normal assortment of
fine tooth ratchets are by far preferable to their less screwdrivers and pliers, you should have the follow-
expensive counterparts. As any good mechanic can ing tools:
tell you, there are few worse experiences than trying
l
Wrenches/sockets and combination open
to work on a vehicle with bad tools. Your monetary end/box end wrenches in sizes from %-% in. or

Mitsubishi Mirage 1990 2000 Workshop Manual Chilton Summary of Content

. 1-2 GENERALINFORMATIONAND MAINTENANCE Chittons Total Car Care manual for the 199M10 Mitsubishi Mirage, Galant and Diamante is intended to help you learn more about the inner workings of your vehicle while saving you money on its upkeep and operation. The beginning of the book will likely be referred to the most, since that is where you will find information for maintenance and tune-up. The other sections deal with the more complex systems of your vehicle. Oper- ating systems from engine through brakes are cov- ered to the extent that the average do-it-yourselfer be- comes mechanically involved. This book will not explain such things as rebuilding a differential for the simple reason that the expertise required and the in- vestment in special tools make this task uneconomi- cal. It will, however, give you detailed instructions to help you change your own brake pads and shoes, re- place spark plugs, and perform many more jobs that can save you money, give you personal satisfaction and help you avoid expensive problems. A secondary purpose of this book is a reference for owners who want to understand their vehicle and/or their mechanics better. In this case, no tools at all are required. Before removing any bolts, read through the entire procedure. This will give you the overall view of what tools and supplies will be required. There is nothing more frustrating than having to walk to the bus stop on Monday morning because you were short one bolt on Sunday afternoon. So read ahead and plan ahead. Each operation should be approached logically and all procedures thoroughly understood before attempt- ing any work. All sections contain adjustments, maintenance, re- moval and installation procedures, and in some cases, repair or overhaul procedures. When repair is not con- sidered practical, we tell you how to remove the part and then how to install the new or rebuilt replacement. In this way, you at least save labor costs. Backyard repair of some components is just not practical. Many procedures in this book require you to label and disconnect. . a group of lines, hoses or wires. Dont be lulled into thinking you can remember where everything goes-you wont. If you hook up vacuum or fuel lines incorrectly, the vehicle may run poorly, if at all. If you hook up electrical wiring incorrectly, you may instantly learn a very expensive lesson. You dont need to know the official or engineering name for each hose or line. A piece of masking tape on the hose and a piece on its fitting will allow you to assign your own label such as the letter A or a short name. As long as you remember your own code, the lines can be reconnected by matching similar letters or names. Do remember that tape will dissolve in gasolrne or other fluids; if a component is to be washed or cleaned, use another method of identifica- tion. A permanent felt-tipped marker or a metal scribe can be very handy for marking metal parts. Remove any tape or paper labels after assembly. Its necessary to mention the difference between maintenance and repair Maintenance includes rou- tine inspections, adjustments, and replacement of parts which show signs of normal wear Maintenance compensates for wear or deterioration. Repair implies that something has broken or is not working. A need for repair is often caused by lack of maintenance. Ex- ample, draining and refilling the automatic transaxle fluid is maintenance recommended by the manufac- turer at specific mileage intervals. Failure to do this can shorten the life of the transmission/transaxle, re- quiring very expensive repairs. While no maintenance program can prevent items from breaking or wearing out, a general rule can be stated: MAINTENANCE IS CHEAPER THAN REPAIR. Two basic mechanrcs rules should be mentioned here. First, whenever the left side of the vehicle or en- gine is referred to, it is meant to specify the drivers side. Conversely, the right side of the vehicle means the passengers side. Second, screws and bolts are removed by turning counterclockwise, and tightened by turning clockwrse unless specifically noted. Safety is always the most important rule. Con- stantly be aware of the dangers involved in working on an automobile and take the proper precautions. See the informatron in this section regarding SER- VICING YOUR VEHICLE SAFELY and the SAFETY NOTICE on the acknowledgment page. Pay attention to the instructions provided. There are 3 common mistakes in mechanical work: 1. Incorrect order of assembly, disassembly or adjustment. When taking something apart or putting it together, performing steps in the wrong order usu- ally just costs you extra time; however, it CAN break something. Read the entire procedure before begin- ning disassembly. Perform everything in the order in which the instructions say you should, even if you cant immedrately see a reason for it. When youre taking apart something that is very intricate, you might want to draw a picture of how it looks when as- sembled at one point in order to make sure you get everything back in its proper position. We will supply exploded views whenever possible. When making adjustments, perform them in the proper order. One adjustment possibly will affect another. 2. Overtorquing (or undertorquing). While it is more common for overtorquing to cause damage, undertorquing may allow a fastener to vibrate loose causing serious damage. Especially when dealing with aluminum parts, pay attention to torque specifi- cations and utilize a torque wrench in assembly. If a torque figure is not available, remember that if you are using the right tool to perform the job, you will probably not have to strain yourself to get a fastener tight enough. The pitch of most threads is so slight that the tension you put on the wrench will be multi- plied many times in actual force on what you are tightening. A good example of how critical torque is can be seen in the case of spark plug installation, es- pecially where you are putting the plug into an alu- minum cylinder head. Too little torque can fail to crush the gasket, causing leakage of combustion gases and consequent overheating of the plug and engine parts. Too much torque can damage the threads or distort the plug, changing the spark gap. There are many commercial products available for ensuring that fasteners wont come loose, even if they are not torqued just right (a very common brand is Loctite? If youre worried about getting something together tight enough to hold, but loose enough to avoid mechanical damage during assembly, one of these products might offer substantial insurance. Be- fore choosing a threadlocking compound, read the label on the package and make sure the product is compatible with the materials, fluids, etc. involved. 3. Crossthreading. This occurs when a part such as a bolt is screwed into a nut or casting at the wrong angle and forced. Crossthreading is more likely to occur if access is difficult. It helps to clean and lubri- cate fasteners, then to start threading the bolt, spark plug, etc. with your fingers If you encounter resis- tance, unscrew the part and start over again at a dif- ferent angle until it can be inserted and turned several times without much effort. Keep in mind that many parts, especially spark plugs, have tapered threads, so that gentle turning will automatically bring the part youre threading to the proper angle. Dont put a wrench on the part until its been tightened a couple of turns by hand. If you suddenly encounter resis- tance, and the part has not seated fully, dont force it. Pull it back out to make sure its clean and threading properly. Be sure to take your time and be patient, and al- ways plan ahead. Allow yourself ample time to per- form repairs and maintenance You may find main- taining your car a satisfying and enjoyable experience. b See Figures 1 thru 15 Naturally, without the proper tools and equipment it is impossible to properly service your vehicle. It would also be virtually impossible to catalog every tool that you would need to perform all of the opera- tions in this book. Of course, It would be unwise for the amateur to rush out and buy an expensive set of tools on the theory that he/she may need one or more of them at some time, The best approach is to proceed slowly, gathering savings will be far outweighed by frustration and a good quality set of those tools that are used most mangled knuckles. frequently Dont be misled by the low cost of bargain Begin accumulating those tools that are used most tools. It is far better to spend a little more for better frequently: those associated with routine maintenance quality. Forged wrenches, 6 or 12-point sockets and and tune-up. In addition to the normal assortment of fine tooth ratchets are by far preferable to their less screwdrivers and pliers, you should have the follow- expensive counterparts. As any good mechanic can ing tools: tell you, there are few worse experiences than trying l Wrenches/sockets and combination open to work on a vehicle with bad tools. Your monetary end/box end wrenches in sizes from %-% in. or